Schlagwort-Archive: jihadi

German Jihadi Militant Killed in Drone Strike

by Florian Flade

Samir H. – German Jihadi killed by US drone in March

On March 9 a US drone fired several missiles at a Pick-Up carrying about a dozen Taliban fighters and foreign militants near the village of Nishpa in South Waziristan. At least six suspected terrorits  were killed in the attack – among them 26-year-old German national Samir H. from Aachen. German newspaper SPIEGEL revealed the news of Samir´s death after it had been kept secret for weeks.

The Islamist, born and raised in East Germany, had traveled to Pakistan in October 2009 with his wife and two children, and joined the „Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan“ (IMU). In November 2009 Samir´s sister, at the age of 18, followed her older brother and made her way to the Waziristan tribal region.

Samir H., son of a Tunisian father and a German mother, is the second German citizen killed by a US drone strike within two years. Bünyamin E., a 20-year old from the city of Wuppertal, died in a similar attack in October 2010. His death caused German politicians as well as lawyers to protest the US policy of drone strike in Pakistan.

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Al-Qaida And The Somali Famine

by Florian Flade

Abu Abdullah al-Muhajir – American Al-Qaida Envoy in Somalia

The young boy stands in the light of the camera, holding bags of beans, rice and a Quran in his hands. „Who gave this to you?“, the journalist asks. „Al-Qaida“, the child answers. „What do you think of them?“ – „I pray for them to win over their enemies“, the boy responds.

This is a scene from a recent documentary by a „Guardian“ camera crew who traveled to Somalia to visit a refugee camp in the south of the country. Somalia has been hit by the worst drought in 60 years. According to the United Nations more than 4 million people are effected by the catastrophy and hundreds of thousands have became refugees of hunger fleeing the drought-hit country-side to move to the camps built by various humanitarian aid organizations and by the Islamist group Al-Shabaab.

When the „Guardian“- team arrived at Ala-Yasir Camp run by Al-Shabaab in the Islamist-controlled South of Somalia, they were surprised to find a very different and shocking form of aid worker handing out food and other supplies to the hungry and suffering – Al-Qaida.

A unit of Al-Qaida fighters arrived at the camp with a truck and a fully-staffed ambulance and several masked men working as staff. Leading the Al-Qaida group was an American Jihadi fighter named „Abu Abdullah al-Muhajir“ who was introduced as „Al-Qaida´s representative to Somalia“.

„Abu Abdullah al-Muhajir“ is a White American, most likely of Arab origin or a convert. He walked around Ala-Yasir Camp, greeting the children and youngsters he met. „Allah is great“, the hundreds of children screamed as a form of welcome. Then Al-Muhajir gave a speech, talking in English with an American accent .

„To our beloved brothers and sisters in Somalia: we are following your situation on a daily basis. And, though we are separated by thousands of kilometres, you are consistently in our thoughts and prayers“, Al-Muhajir said. He also claims Al-Qaida´s new Emir Dr.Ayman az-Zawahiri is sending his greetings to Somalia.

The American Jihadi then gave out the aid he brought to the refugee camp – rice, oil, beans, dates, milk and Quran. When the sun set, the Al-Qaida militant opened bags full of cash, handing out Somali shillings to the equivalent of $17,000.

While the Somali terror group Al-Shabaab has banned most international organizations including the World Food Programme (WFP) from operating in Somalia, it seems Al-Qaida has replaced at least some of the Western aid workers. In cooperation with the Al-Shabaab members, Al-Qaida is showing very different face, acting almost like a humanitarian organization. The militants „Guardian“ met, talked aid instead of Jihad.

Some of the Al-Shabaab fighters working in Ala-Yasir Camp were Western-born and raised Muslims. Most of these foreigners allegedly are from the UK. „I´m an aid worker, basically“, British „Abu Omar“ told the journalists, „typical aid worker, as you say in the west.“ Helping the hungry was a religious duty, the British Jihadi said: „It’s a religious obligation. I mean, we left our countries. I left, we left our jobs, all these places just to come here and help our people.“

Hundreds of foreign Islamists from Europe, North America, Pakistan, other African and Arab countries have come to Somalia in recent years to receive terrorist training in the Al-Shabaab camps. Numerous of the Western Jihadis including a number of Americans have died fighting Somali government troops, Ethiopian forces and African Union (AU) soldiers, some of them as suicide bombers.

Now it seems Al-Qaida has stepped up activities in Somalia most likely with an aim to recruit and implement a base in the war-torn country. Western intellgence agencies witness these events with great concern. Especially British and Scandinavian counter-terrorism officials have warned of the terror threat emerging from Somalia and those Islamists trained there. The recent „Guardian“ piece shows: Al-Qaida has successfully established a base in Somalia.

Pakistan Captures Al-Qaida Operative Sheikh Younis al-Mauretani

by Florian Flade

He is one of Al-Qaida´s most shadowy and mysterious figures in the Pakistani tribal areas – Sheikh Younis Mohammed al-Mauretani.

Pakistan´s military forces today announced Al-Mauretani´s arrest in a written statement, saying the North African Al-Qaida operative was captured in the city of Quetta close to the Afghan border. Along with al-Mauretani two other Arab Al-Qaida members, named Abdul Ghaffar Al Shami (Bachar Chama) and Messara Al Shami (Mujahid Amino) were arrested. No Details were given on these two men.

Sheikh Younis al-Mauretani was labeled Al-Qaida´s Chief of External Operations by the Pakistani intelligence agency ISI, holding one of the most important positions within the terrorist network. „He was planning to target United States economic interests including gas/oil pipelines, power generating dams, and strike ships/oil tankers through explosive laden speed boats in International waters“, the Pakistani ISI claims in a statement. Cooperation with the CIA led to the arrest of Al-Mauretani, the statement further explains.

Counter-terrorism officials in the USA and Pakistan believe al-Mauretani was in direct contact with Bin Laden until US Navy SEALs killed the Al-Qaida leader in May. Inside the Abbottabad compound were Bin Laden was hiding, documents were found which are confirming that al-Mauretani was the mastermind behind a 2010 terrorist plot to target European economy. A strategy paper written by Al-Mauretani suggested to hit especially economic targets in the West to harm the USA and Europe. From what is known it seems Bin Laden approved this plan and promised the financing of the terror attacks.

Most of what is known about Al-Mauretani was revealed during the interrogation of two German terror suspects arrested last year. Ahmad Wali Siddiqi and Rami Makanesi from Hamburg had traveled to the Waziristan terrorist training camps in March 2009. Both of them met Al-Mauretani in early 2010 when the Al-Qaida operative was searching for Western recruits. „Al-Qaida´s No.3 – Foreign Minister“ – Al-Mauretani introduced himself to the Jihadis from Germany.

Makanesi describes al-Mauretani as a skinny, tall person with a calm manner, well-spoken and intelligent. „What we have are planning, not even the devil has in mind“, al-Mauretani had told the German terrorists in Waziristan according to Makanesi and Siddiqi. He later outlined his „Europe Plot“ to them, telling them about his idea of striking economic targets in various European countries.

In January or February 2010 Sheikh al-Mauretani had met another German Jihadi who arrived at the Al-Qaida training camps – Abdelkarim el-K., a Moroccan who lived and studied in Düsseldorf. After returning to Germany El-K. formed a terrorist cell he became the leader of. While the group planned to obtain or produce explosives El-K. tried to contact the Al-Qaida commanders in Waziristan for advice. One of the people he tried to contact but could not reach was none other than Al-Mauretani.

In addition to what Makanesi and Siddiqi told German and American intelligence most information available on al-Mauretani is believed to be rumors and unconfirmed reports by Arab intelligence agencies. Some sources say the Mauretanian Al-Qaida suspect had studied in Egypt and later left the country to join Bin Laden in Afghanistan. Others say al-Mauretani lived in Saudi-Arabia before coming to Waziristan and that he owned a football club there.